Good health is blowing in the wind

“The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind.” ~ Bob Dylan

wind

It appears that just being outside in the wind will improve your health.

Alice Fleeracker explains:

There are lots of theories about why spending time in nature might be so good for us. Some researchers, like Qing Li, a physician at Nippon Medical School Hospital and the President of the Japanese Society of Forest Medicine, believe the answer may literally be blowing in the wind. He and his team have spent years studying the effects of phytoncides, antibacterial and antimicrobial substances that trees and other plants release into the air to help them fight diseases and harmful organisms. When humans breathe in these substances—typically by spending time in nature—their health can improve. Across several studies, phytoncides have been shown to boost immune function, increase anticancer protein production, reduce stress hormones, improve mood, and help people relax.

In the Netherlands, she writes, people have been seeking out windy exercise for more than a hundred years.

Today, the practice is so common that it’s known as “uitwaaien.” It “literally translates to ‘outblowing,’” explains Caitlin Meyer, a lecturer at the University of Amsterdam’s Department of Dutch Linguistics. “It’s basically the activity of spending time in the wind, usually by going for a walk or a bike ride.” Meyer has lived in the Netherlands for more than 20 years and has come to specialize in the language, despite being a non-native speaker. She says uitwaaien is a popular activity where she lives—one believed to have important psychological benefits. “Uitwaaien is something you do to clear your mind and feel refreshed—out with the bad air, in with the good,” she tells me. “It’s seen as a pleasant, easy, and relaxing experience—a way to destress or escape from daily life.”

So enjoy the wind.

“The wind is like the golden breath of the world; when it blows, we feel that the world is alive and so are we!” Mehmet Murat ildan wrote. He also wrote: “There is nothing more beautiful than living a simple life in this complex universe!”

Goya may just save your life

trmp beansGoya Foods, the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the United States, is being boycotted by The Left because its chairman, Robert Unanue, described Americans as “truly blessed” to have President Trump’s leadership. And he’s not backing down.

I encurage you to buy a Goya product every time you go to the store. They have a lot more than beans.

Biut it’s the beans that may save you. Here’s why:

  • People who consume beans regularly may be less likely to die of a heart attack or other cardiovascular problem.
  • Some studies have shown that beans act as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. These effects could reduce the risk of cancer.
  • Beans may help stabilize blood glucose levels or even prevent diabetes. Beans are high in fiber, which can help lower blood glucose.
  • When a person eats beans, the fiber and healthful starches they contain can help create a feeling of fullness and satisfaction, curbing appetite.
  • Research has shown a variety of beans, especially black beans, enhance gut health by improving intestinal barrier function and increasing the number of beneficial bacteria. This may help prevent gut-associated diseases.
  • Healthful gut bacteria also support immune system function and may promote weight loss. Beans feed the healthful gut bacteria colonies.

goyaHere’s another reason to boycott Goya.”

Goya Gives” is a program to support various charities, scholarships, and events, and includes donations of products to food shelters and food banks during times of crisis, such as Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. In March and April 2020, in response to the Coronavirus pandemic, Goya donated over 300,000 pounds of food, or about 270,000 meals, to food banks and other organizations in the United States, and also donated more than 20,000 protective masks.

Try this: Next time there’s a food drive at your church or in your community, buy Goya.

~ Yarra Banker

Is it safe to go out yet?

go ouit

  • Is it safe to go to the grocery store? And, how often is okay?
  • How safe is it to fly on a commercial airline? Get a haircut? Go out to dinner?
  • Should I avoid a friend whose daughter works where someone tested positive?

We now have to factor a new set of often unknown or not fully known risks into our everyday decisions. Here are some guidelines from Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Senior Faculty Editor at Harvard Health Publishing.

If you’re considering relaxing restrictions in your work or social life, consider these three important steps:

And then what? Weigh the four Ps to round out your reckoning of risks and benefits:

  • Personal risk tolerance. Is your mantra “better safe than sorry”? Or is it closer to “you only live once”?
  • Personality. If you’re an extrovert, you may be willing to dial down your restrictions (and accept more risk) because the alternative feels like torture. For introverts, limiting social interactions may not seem so bad.
  • Priorities. If you put a high priority on dining out, getting your hair done, or getting a tattoo, it’s a bigger sacrifice to put these off than it is for someone who doesn’t care about these things.
  • Pocketbook. Although the pandemic affects everyone, it does not affect everyone equally: some can weather the economic impact better than others. As a result, keeping one’s business closed or staying home from work are less appealing for some than others.

Finally, listen to the experts and their recommendations, especially when they change in response to new information. Spread out your risk: if you go to the grocery store today, put off your haircut to another day — in this way, the “virus dose” may be lower than if you’re out doing multiple errands among other people over a few hours.

Listen to those you live with. They’re affected by your decisions, too.

~ Heteroclite

Miracles: Finding cures in nature

And God said, “Let the water teem with living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the vault of the sky.” So God created the great creatures of the sea and every living thing with which the water teems and that moves about in it, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 

Then God said, “Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so that they may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.”

crabThe Race for a Coronavirus Vaccine Runs on Horseshoe Crab Blood

Pharmaceutical companies use the creature’s blue blood to test for contaminants. umans owe a debt to the strange-looking, ancient horseshoe crab. Its blue blood is used in medicine to ensure that anything that gets injected or implanted into the human body is free of potentially life-threatening bacterial contamination. A special compound in the crab’s blood quickly clots in the presence of endotoxins, microbial byproducts that can be harmful, supplying a perfect natural test for purity. In the race to find a COVID-19 vaccine, horseshoe crab blood is very important.

New Spider Silk Vaccine May Prevent Cancer

New technique developed by encapsulating a vaccine into a spider silk microparticle may prevent cancer and major infectious diseases. To strengthen the efficacy of vaccines on the immune system – and in particular on T lymphocytes, specialized in the detection of cancer cells – researchers have developed spider silk microcapsules capable of delivering the vaccine directly to the heart of immune cells. This process could also be applied to preventive vaccines to protect against infectious diseases and constitutes an important step towards vaccines that are stable, easy to use, and resistant to the most extreme storage conditions.

snailSea snail venom could lead to better insulin for diabetics

The Conus geographus, a species of venomous sea snail, preys on fish by emitting plumes of venom that stun and paralyze its prey, allowing time for the snail to slime along and eat the fish while it’s still alive. But the venom might be useful to humans, too. Inside the venom, there are hundreds of [different] molecules. One of the molecules looks very similar to [human] insulin, and researchers found that it works far more quickly than human insulin. While human insulin can take up to half an hour to impact blood glucose levels, the venom insulin works almost instantly, causing the fish’s blood sugar to spike and temporarily paralyzing them.

butterflyWe can soon thank butterfly tongues for better cancer treatments and vaccines

Butterflies have devised various highly efficient transport systems that move droplets, only a few microns in diameter, through their proboscices by taking advantage of basic physical forces like capillary action. This gas important applications for human technologies. For example, butterfly-inspired probes may soon deliver toxic anti-cancer agents to the interior of cancerous cells—a revolutionary breakthrough that would allow doctors to destroy wildly replicating cancerous cells but minimize risks to healthy tissues. Or, the evolutionary strategies worked out by butterflies may help surgeons deliver nano-liter quantities of blood to the tiniest of human blood vessels, thus preventing them from becoming oxygen-deprived.

A Tiny Worm Has Been Found Carrying New Antibiotic That Could Help Us Fight Superbugs

As the fight against antibiotic-resistant superbugs continues to get more dire, scientists may have found a new weapon for tackling some of the worst superbugs we know of: a new antibiotic called darobactin, which is able to take on gram-negative bacteria. Darobactin took some finding though, across two years of research – the antibiotic compound was discovered in Photorhabdus bacteria, lurking inside the gut of tiny parasitic worms known as nematodes. The hope is that darobactin can be developed into something suitable for humans – the first time such a leap would have been made from an animal microbiome 

~ Heteroclite

 

Self Reliance: Who you gonna trust?

expert

“The most dangerous man, to any government, is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to prevailing superstition or taboo.” ~ H. L. Mencken

“I’m part of your government but I’m here today to say that government can’t save you.” ~ Sen. Rand Paul

This week the World Health organization was forced to clarify itself.

Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, an epidemiologist and the WHO’s technical lead on the COVID-19 pandemic, had said at a regular press briefing that data the WHO has received suggests it is “very rare” to have an asymptomatic person transmit the disease.

Following an onslaught of confusion expressed from social media, including from doctors, journalists, and epidemiologists, the WHO hosted a livestream on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, to clarify questions surrounding transmission of the CCP virus, commonly known as the novel coronavirus.

The highly esteemed New York Times pubished this: “Even as the World Health Organization leads the worldwide response to the coronavirus pandemic, the agency is failing to take stock of rapidly evolving research findings and to communicate clearly about them, several scientists warned.”

Do you need to stay home, or can you get up close and personal if you believe something?

You must stay home to save lives. You must socially distance and lock down. Unless you’re protesting racism and police brutality.

This appears to be the message from some government and health officials, who for months enforced a rigorous and unprecedented economic shutdown in the name of stemming the spread of the coronavirus pandemic — resulting in millions losing their jobs and students being sent home from schools across the country.

Maybe you trust our beloved CDC. Oops.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is conflating the results of two different types of coronavirus tests, distorting several important metrics and providing the country with an inaccurate picture of the state of the pandemic.

Well, give them a second chance. Oh dear.

Earlier this month, the federal health agency appears to have quietly reformatted its page on how COVID-19 spreads. Previously, under a subheading titled “spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects,” the agency simply said it “may be possible” to contract the virus from contaminated surfaces.

For those of you still wiping down groceries and other packages amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, breathe a sigh of relief: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now says the novel virus “does not spread easily” from “touching surfaces or objects”.

Remember Dr. Deborah “Scarf Lady” Birx? During a coronavirus meeting with Robert Redfield, the director of CDC, Birx, said, “There is nothing from the CDC that I can trust.”

Whoa, Deb.

So just strap on your mask and go about your business. Wait …

Two of the world’s major health organisations disagree on mask wearing. The World Health Organisation (WHO) currently discourages mask use:”There is currently no evidence that wearing a mask (whether medical or other types) by healthy persons in the wider community setting, including universal community masking, can prevent them from infection with respiratory viruses, including COVID-19.

By contrast, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States has recently recommended everyone wear a (cloth) mask. However, this is to prevent infected people passing on the infection, not to prevent the wearer getting infected.

Got that? You do know we’re all gonna die, right. Maybe not.

~ Hygge

Wanna bet your life on a model?

maxresdefaultNext time we go through one of these pandemic panics, we need to ask two questions; “Sez who?” and “How come it is?”

We closed down entire countries based on seriously flawed models, most notoriously that of British scientist Neil Ferguson of Imperial College.

The model was severely flawed. The model’s software was 13 years old, with a program that predicted at random. Adding on to the fact is that new records are coming out of this particular scientist of a history of failed predictions.

“In 2001 the Imperial College team’s modelling led to the culling of 6 million livestock and was criticised by epidemiological experts as severely flawed. In various years in the early 2000s Ferguson predicted up to 136,000 deaths from mad cow disease, 200 million from bird flu and 65,000 from swine flu. The final death toll in each case was in the hundreds,” note biologist Matt Ridley and Member of Parliament David Davis. “In this case, when a Swedish team applied the modified model that Imperial put into the public domain to Sweden’s strategy, it predicted 40,000 deaths by May 1 – 15 times too high.”

The UK shut down because of Ferguson’s model, yet Ferguson and Imperial College refused all requests to examine taxpayer-funded code that supported one of the most significant peacetime decisions.

Next time, when you hear a prediction, decide to wait until all the evidence is in. Ferguson would appear at first glance to be reputable, so don’t trust any old “expert.” Always ask: Who are you? How do you know? Keep questioning. And if the experts and government officials tell you to do something, always ask, “Why?” Keep asking “Why?.”

~ Nimrod

Whole milk is good for you

cow

God made cows and cows make milk full of fat and, the Bible says, “and God saw that it was good.” If it pleases the Big Guy, it’s good enough for me.

So don’t go second guessing Him, even if your doctor tells you to. Doctors can be as foolish as the rest of us.

Full fat milk (the kind cows make and of which God approves) can help prevent diabetes and other bad things.

Eating at least two daily servings of dairy is linked to lower risks of diabetes and high blood pressure, as well as the cluster of factors that heighten cardiovascular disease risk (metabolic syndrome), according to a large international study published online in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.

Here’s a good rule of thumb for living life: Avoid syndromes when possible.

Of course we’ve known this about milk for some time. You can also mix some dark chocolate in your whole milk.

Who says there is no God?

~ Hippocrene

 

This is not your father’s coronavirus

covidFor most of the population — 80 percent, they say — the Kung Flu was a non event. If they got sick it lasted a week or so and was a flu-like annoyance.

For 15 percent of us, however, it became a serious illness. For 5 percent, it became critical, and in this last group were those who died.

I had it, and it took six weeks to fully recover. I didn’t require hospitalization and never became critical, although as I read more about it I did worry at times and asked my doctor for reassurance. What my research tells me is that living or dying for some is a result of a genetic roll of the dice. Some people have immune responses that just don’t work right.

My doctor says I’m not contagious and that I’m immune, at least for the time being. This is the thinking of the CDC. What I know is that I’m going to take this thing seriously, especially in the fall when we start closing wndows and staying inside.

Here’s the headline of a USA Today article:

‘Something we’ve never seen before’: Scientists still trying to understand baffling, unpredictable coronavirus

The article continues:

The new coronavirus has spread like wildfire, killed – and spared – people of all ages and all health conditions, baffled doctors, defied guidance and conventional wisdom, and produced an unprecedented array of symptoms.

There’s never been a virus like it.

“This gets into every major biological process in our cells,” said Nevan J. Krogan, a molecular biologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who has studied HIV, Ebola, Zika, dengue and other viruses over the past 13 years.

“At the molecular level, it’s something we’ve never seen before, and then look at what it does to the body – the long list of symptoms – we’ve never seen that before.”

I’m sympathetic to the point of view that our national reaction has been overblown. At the same time, having experienced the virus, I have a deep respect for it.

There are some who beieve that we can’t really stop a virus from spreading, no matter how many masks we buy. I’m sympathetic to that, as well, but I’m not going to needlessly expose myself or family to it.

~ Al Desko

 

Kung Flu Scoundrels: Take a number

Are our “betters” being deliberately stupid and obnoxious?

waltersDr. William Walters. He’s an Obama holdover in an obscure State Department office who helped cause the coronavirus crisis. President Trump had been told that nobody with the coronavirus would be flown to America. But Walters made the decision to fly back infected American passengers from the Diamond Princess. This helped spread the virus inside the United States. President Obama honored Walters for evacuating Ebola patients to the United States.

Andrew Cuomo. The coronavirus’ suspected death toll among New York’s nursing home residents exploded by an additional 1,700 fatalities — as Gov. Andrew Cuomo caught bipartisan backlash for his administration’s edict that the facilities take in COVID-19 patients. “I don’t know the details, frankly,” the governor lied. And, health care workers that came to New York to help fight the coronavirus pandemic at its epicenter will have to pay state taxes, according to the governor.

Neil Ferguson. This British scientist, whose wildly wrong coronavirus model prompted U.S. and UK lockdowns, resigned after being caught breaking social distancing rules with his married lover.

Ken Turnage. This California city official said COVID-19 should be allowed to run its kennyturnagecourse, killing elderly and homeless residents to “fix what is a significant burden on our society. We would have significant loss of life, we would lose many elderly, that would reduce burdens in our defunct Social Security System, health care cost — once the wave subsided — make jobs available for others and it would also free up housing in which we are in dire need of.” He was fired.

Nancy Pelosi. “We all have found our ways to keep our spirits up during these trying times,” she said. “Mine just happens to fill up my freezer.” The appliances, two large stainless-steel freezers, are filled to the brim with an extreme prestige brand name called Jeni’s, which is marketed largely over the internet and sells for a minimum of $12 a pint. “Nancy Pelosi remembers to stock her $24K refrigerators with $13 ice cream but forgot to restock the Paycheck Protection Program for our small businesses,” Texas Rep. Dan Crenshaw tweeted.

Alex Villanueva. The Los Angeles County Sheriff is worried that there might be a crime wave coming after he released what amounts to 4,276 inmates over the coronavirus concerns.

Enough for now. Many are waiting in the wings.

~ Excursus

So what’s the deal with Tony Fauci?

Supporters of Donald Trump are skeptical of Dr. Anthony Fauci, a visible member of the President’s Kung Flu task force, and rightly so.

Tony visibly smirked when the President referred to “the Deep State Department.” Watch:

And then Tony showed solidarity with two “reporters” who were rude and antagonistic with Trump, giving them a thumbs up as they saluted. Watch:

You can read about these faux journalists here. They aren’t real journalists, but they play them on TV.

So what do we know about Doctor Tony? Turns out he’s part of the Washington in crowd, the effetes who consider themselves smarter and more righteous than Donald Trump. This incudes Hillary Clinton, who was smart enough to lose the election to Trump.

In 2016, Doctor Tony wrote Hillary a love letter: “Please tell her that we all love her and are proud to know her.”

Here is Doctor Tony with fellow members of the Swamp Elite.

hillary fauci (1)

Fauci Bill

pelosi fauci (1)

fauci obama (1)

faucigateshandshake

And a parting shot with his buddy, Acosta

fauci acosta

Swamp rat.

~ Scheherazade