How Google is manipulating the election

googleGoogle hopes to shift 10 percent of the voting public away from Trump to fulfill a company executive’s stated goal of making populism nothing more than a “blip in history.”

That’s from Dr. Robert Epstein, the senior research psychologist at the American Institute for Behavioral Research and Technology. He describes himself as “not a conservative.”

“I don’t think a lot of people by and large understand exactly how much they can manipulate you, Google can, with just a slight tweak to search results or search suggestions or their algorithm.”

Blogger Doug Ross bears witness to this. “Google is actively re-ordering search results, censoring news, and hiding damaging information against @thedemocrats. To put it bluntly, Google appears to be deleting search results that criticize its use of algorithms to enforce totalitarian political bias.”

You can even use Google itself to learn this.

You can find alternative search engines here. A lot of people like DuckDuckGo. You might also try Gibiru. The latter says it doesn’t censor the results. DuckDuckGo and others don’t track you, but I don’t know if they censor. I mistakenly thought StartPage was a good alternative, but I have just learned that it uses Google results. Good grief.

~ Gazunder

 

Good health is blowing in the wind

“The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind.” ~ Bob Dylan

wind

It appears that just being outside in the wind will improve your health.

Alice Fleeracker explains:

There are lots of theories about why spending time in nature might be so good for us. Some researchers, like Qing Li, a physician at Nippon Medical School Hospital and the President of the Japanese Society of Forest Medicine, believe the answer may literally be blowing in the wind. He and his team have spent years studying the effects of phytoncides, antibacterial and antimicrobial substances that trees and other plants release into the air to help them fight diseases and harmful organisms. When humans breathe in these substances—typically by spending time in nature—their health can improve. Across several studies, phytoncides have been shown to boost immune function, increase anticancer protein production, reduce stress hormones, improve mood, and help people relax.

In the Netherlands, she writes, people have been seeking out windy exercise for more than a hundred years.

Today, the practice is so common that it’s known as “uitwaaien.” It “literally translates to ‘outblowing,’” explains Caitlin Meyer, a lecturer at the University of Amsterdam’s Department of Dutch Linguistics. “It’s basically the activity of spending time in the wind, usually by going for a walk or a bike ride.” Meyer has lived in the Netherlands for more than 20 years and has come to specialize in the language, despite being a non-native speaker. She says uitwaaien is a popular activity where she lives—one believed to have important psychological benefits. “Uitwaaien is something you do to clear your mind and feel refreshed—out with the bad air, in with the good,” she tells me. “It’s seen as a pleasant, easy, and relaxing experience—a way to destress or escape from daily life.”

So enjoy the wind.

“The wind is like the golden breath of the world; when it blows, we feel that the world is alive and so are we!” Mehmet Murat ildan wrote. He also wrote: “There is nothing more beautiful than living a simple life in this complex universe!”

Goya may just save your life

trmp beansGoya Foods, the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the United States, is being boycotted by The Left because its chairman, Robert Unanue, described Americans as “truly blessed” to have President Trump’s leadership. And he’s not backing down.

I encurage you to buy a Goya product every time you go to the store. They have a lot more than beans.

Biut it’s the beans that may save you. Here’s why:

  • People who consume beans regularly may be less likely to die of a heart attack or other cardiovascular problem.
  • Some studies have shown that beans act as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. These effects could reduce the risk of cancer.
  • Beans may help stabilize blood glucose levels or even prevent diabetes. Beans are high in fiber, which can help lower blood glucose.
  • When a person eats beans, the fiber and healthful starches they contain can help create a feeling of fullness and satisfaction, curbing appetite.
  • Research has shown a variety of beans, especially black beans, enhance gut health by improving intestinal barrier function and increasing the number of beneficial bacteria. This may help prevent gut-associated diseases.
  • Healthful gut bacteria also support immune system function and may promote weight loss. Beans feed the healthful gut bacteria colonies.

goyaHere’s another reason to boycott Goya.”

Goya Gives” is a program to support various charities, scholarships, and events, and includes donations of products to food shelters and food banks during times of crisis, such as Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. In March and April 2020, in response to the Coronavirus pandemic, Goya donated over 300,000 pounds of food, or about 270,000 meals, to food banks and other organizations in the United States, and also donated more than 20,000 protective masks.

Try this: Next time there’s a food drive at your church or in your community, buy Goya.

~ Yarra Banker

Here’s why you’re going crazy

asylumHow can anyone stay sane with this going on out there?

Op-Ed: Is Medical Waste … Racist?

The Unintentional Racism Found in Traffic Signals

‘Upward-thrusting buildings ejaculating into the sky’ – do cities have to be so sexist?

Why more parents are turning to homeschooling

weirdIn a USA Today/Ipsos poll, 60 percent of parents said they will likely choose at-home learning this fall rather than send their children to school even if the schools reopen. Thirty percent said they were “very likely” to keep their children home.

That seems high to me. Still, after having the kids home for months, it seems many are onsidering keeping them there.

For many parents, it’s not the virus they are avoiding by keeping their children home—it’s the response to the virus, Kerry McDonald writes. Guidelines from the CDC would make school a horrible experience. It may also be that many parents don’t have jobs waiting for them to return.

There’s another, and stronger, reason to teach your kids at home if you can. David Harsanyi writes:

It’s likely that left-wing ideologues run your school district. They decide what your children learn. They are the ones who decide that your kid can protest the Second Amendment of the Constitution, but never, not in a million years, march for any cause the Founders might have championed. It was one thing when these schools were producing mere Democrats, and it’s quite another now that they’re churning out hordes of chillingly ignorant voters.

The challenge as I see it is that so many parents of school-age children are holding down two jobs. At least they were before the virus. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

The labor force participation rate—the percent of the population working or looking for work—for all women with children under age 18 was 72.3 percent in 2019, up from 71.5 percent in the prior year. Married mothers remained less likely to participate in the labor force, at 69.9 percent, than mothers with other marital statuses, at 77.6 percent.

Many are speculating that people will end up working from home permanently. Perhaps it will then be easier to keep the kids at home, maybe working out joint teaching arrangements with ohter parents. We’ll see.

~ Descamisado

Are you afraid to go out?

assaultIt’s not the virus anymore, it’s the violence. Above: a 15-year-old girl being attacked in Brooklyn.

Similar to the well-known “knock out” game, violent black males began attacking random white people as part of the Black Lives Matter movement.  The objective is to violently beat any random white person while a friend or ally films the brutality.  It is also known as “polar bear hunting’.

elderlywomanDoesn’t matter if you’re a young boy or an elderly lady. Be in the wrong place at the wrong time, and you could get it.

 

What they’re accompishing is reinforcing is the fear white people have of encountering young blacks on the sidewalk. Whether that fear was real or imagined before, it’s becoming something people have ot think about. So these thugs are destroying whatever goodwill the races shared.

The liberal politcians must be aghast at another result: people are buying guns like crazy: there’s a nationwide spike in personal weapons sales. In June, the FBI checked the backgrounds of 3,931,607 potential gun buyers, according to the Bureau. In the same month, Americans bought 2,387,524 guns,

This is being fueled by leftist politicians like Mayor DeBlasio in New York, who wants to cut $1 billion from the police force and who eliminated the street crime division. He’s a marxist for whom chaos is a weapon. Gun violence exploded across the city after the NYPD disbanded its anti-crime unit of plainclothes cops on June 15, with three times as many shootings in the last two weeks of the month over the same period in 2019,

You might end up like attorney and writer David French who carries a gun and explains why in, of all places, The Atlantic.

~ Onymous

“We will stand firm and unwavering.”

trumpI saw only the first part of President Trump’s Mount Rushmore speech, but several people have said it is his best.

Roger Kimball, editor and publisher of The New Criterion, writes:

Looking back on the 2020 election, historians will say that last night’s speech was the moment that Donald Trump won reelection. It was a magnificent speech that will, I predict, take an honored place in the library of great American political addresses.

So I read it, and it is very good. Follow the link, and see for yourself. Watch it here. Why not share it with your children and discuss it? (Side note: When I search Google-owned YouTube for the speech the first thing that came up was a video of CNN’s Briant Stelter with this title: “Stelter: Trump’s Mt. Rushmore speech won’t make sense to most people.” Kinda proves Trump’s point.)

Here’s a passage of President Trump’s speech that stood out for me:

We are the country of Andrew Jackson, Ulysses S. Grant, and Frederick Douglass. We are the land of Wild Bill Hickock and Buffalo Bill Cody. (Applause.) We are the nation that gave rise to the Wright Brothers, the Tuskegee Airmen — (applause) — Harriet Tubman, Clara Barton, Jesse Owens, George Patton — General George Patton — the great Louie Armstrong, Alan Shepard, Elvis Presley, and Mohammad Ali. (Applause.) And only America could have produced them all. (Applause.) No other place.

We are the culture that put up the Hoover Dam, laid down the highways, and sculpted the skyline of Manhattan. We are the people who dreamed a spectacular dream — it was called: Las Vegas, in the Nevada desert; who built up Miami from the Florida marsh; and who carved our heroes into the face of Mount Rushmore. (Applause.)

Americans harnessed electricity, split the atom, and gave the world the telephone and the Internet. We settled the Wild West, won two World Wars, landed American astronauts on the Moon — and one day very soon, we will plant our flag on Mars.

We gave the world the poetry of Walt Whitman, the stories of Mark Twain, the songs of Irving Berlin, the voice of Ella Fitzgerald, the style of Frank Sinatra — (applause) — the comedy of Bob Hope, the power of the Saturn V rocket, the toughness of the Ford F-150 — (applause) — and the awesome might of the American aircraft carriers.

Quite a story.

~ Aphelion

Is it safe to go out yet?

go ouit

  • Is it safe to go to the grocery store? And, how often is okay?
  • How safe is it to fly on a commercial airline? Get a haircut? Go out to dinner?
  • Should I avoid a friend whose daughter works where someone tested positive?

We now have to factor a new set of often unknown or not fully known risks into our everyday decisions. Here are some guidelines from Robert H. Shmerling, MD, Senior Faculty Editor at Harvard Health Publishing.

If you’re considering relaxing restrictions in your work or social life, consider these three important steps:

And then what? Weigh the four Ps to round out your reckoning of risks and benefits:

  • Personal risk tolerance. Is your mantra “better safe than sorry”? Or is it closer to “you only live once”?
  • Personality. If you’re an extrovert, you may be willing to dial down your restrictions (and accept more risk) because the alternative feels like torture. For introverts, limiting social interactions may not seem so bad.
  • Priorities. If you put a high priority on dining out, getting your hair done, or getting a tattoo, it’s a bigger sacrifice to put these off than it is for someone who doesn’t care about these things.
  • Pocketbook. Although the pandemic affects everyone, it does not affect everyone equally: some can weather the economic impact better than others. As a result, keeping one’s business closed or staying home from work are less appealing for some than others.

Finally, listen to the experts and their recommendations, especially when they change in response to new information. Spread out your risk: if you go to the grocery store today, put off your haircut to another day — in this way, the “virus dose” may be lower than if you’re out doing multiple errands among other people over a few hours.

Listen to those you live with. They’re affected by your decisions, too.

~ Heteroclite

Dad Jokes: Ward Cleaver, call your office

“I was just looking at my ceiling. Not sure if it’s the best ceiling in the world, but it’s definitely up there.” ~ Dad

dadA couple of years ago Ashley Fetters, a writer for The Atlantic took a good long look at dad jokes. If you want to see what a serious journalist can do with a serious subject, this is your go-to article. You won’t finish it.

She elaborates:

Many varieties of jokes that get called dad jokes. Many dad jokes operate on “anti-humor,” or the deliberate denial of a clever punch line: “What did the farmer say when he lost his tractor? ‘Where’s my tractor?’” Others boil down to just playful, willful misunderstanding of a situation, for seemingly no reason. My granddad, for example, liked to pretend he thought my name was Mildred. (It is not.)

But if there’s one feature that can immediately categorize a joke as a “dad joke,” it’s wordplay, especially of the unsophisticated variety. Examples: “Hey, do you know what time my dentist appointment is? Tooth-hurty.” “You know why they always build fences around cemeteries? Because people are dying to get in.” The purposeful confusion of “smart feller” and “fart smeller.” This famous exchange: “I’m hungry.” “Hi, Hungry. I’m Dad.”

We interrupt this blog post to give you a break. Don’t worry. We’ll put you back together.

Stanley Dubinsky, an English professor at the University of South Carolina and the father of two young-adult sons, is a frequent deployer of dad jokes, mostly of the non-pun variety; he likes to deliberately mispronounce words sometimes, just to hear his kids groan and scoff exasperatedly. Dubinsky’s also a linguist and the co-author of the book Understanding Language Through Humor, and as he explains it, there’s a particular type of wordplay that gives a joke the dubious distinction of being a dad joke.

Polysemy, derived from the Greek terms for “many” and “signs,” is the coexistence of several meanings or uses for the same word. And as Dubinsky explains, dying to get in demonstrates the polysemy of the word dying by implying that someone is eager or desirous rather than in the act of perishing. “Most jokes rely on some semantic ambiguity or grammatical ambiguity,” Dubinsky says. “The things people call ‘dad jokes’ are the ones where the ambiguity is crushingly obvious.”

Fetters helpfully provides sources for dad jokes.

The Reddit page r/dadjokes, a forum where users go to share and enjoy “the jokes that make you laugh and cringe in equal measure,” has more than 1 million subscribers and amasses several new posts every hour. The online video series Dad Jokes, which pits comedians and celebrities against each other in dad-joke-telling competitions where “if you laugh you lose,” launched in 2017 and today has some 999,000 followers on Facebook. Twitter users, meanwhile, frequently call each other (and themselves) out for their simplest and squeaky-cleanest puns by tweeting “#dadjoke.”

There you go: public service journalism

“My wife is really mad at the fact that I have no sense of direction. So I packed up my stuff and right!” ~ Dad

~ Aischrolatreia

Tear down statues, join the barbarian elite

“Only barbarians are not curious about where they come from, how they came to be where they are, where they appear to be going, whether they wish to go there, and if so, why, and if not, why not. ” ~ Isaiah Berlin

statueRemember how much fun the barbarians of ISIS had destroying statues a few years ago?

Islamic State militants ransacked Mosul’s central museum, destroying priceless artefacts that are thousands of years old, in the group’s latest rampage which threatens to upend millennia of coexistence in the Middle East.

“The birthplace of human civilisation … is being destroyed”, said Kino Gabriel, one of the leaders of the Syriac Military Council – a Christian militia – in a telephone interview with the Guardian from Hassakeh in north-eastern Syria.

“In front of something like this, we are speechless,” said Gabriel. “Murder of people and destruction is not enough, so even our civilisation and the culture of our people is being destroyed.”

statue kickingWell, our barbarians are better than their barbarians!

They’re pulling down statues simply because they are statues. Our barbarians have no idea what they mean. Did I say no idea? I did.

Our elitist barbarians are getting in on the action, too!

Popular Mechanics offers: “How to Topple a Statue Using Science.”

Then, “Museum curator tweets advice on how to destroy bronze statues with chemicals after BLM protests. Says next target is memorial to ‘racist’ Winston Churchill.”

And now: Calling the recent US trend of angry mobs destroying statues “inspiring but a bit amateur,” leaders of ISIS and the Taliban have agreed to send advisors to Antifa and other far left groups on how to erase historical artifacts.

Okay, that last one is satire. Or is it?

~ Gobustan