Why they hate The Don so much

trump

They detest him because he is an alpha male. People are always a bit afraid of an alpha male, since that’s how alpha males get and retain power. And, in the current zeitgeist, beta males are ascendant.

Look at The Donald strolling through Washington to a church for a photo op. Everyone missed the point of that: The Alpha Male was showing us he is not afraid to walk the streets that had recently seen riots.

And then we had The Donald telling governors that, “Most of you are weak, If you don’t dominate, you’re wasting your time. They’re going to run over you. You’re going to look like a bunch of jerks. You have to dominate.”

That’s the sound of an alpha male.

Meantime, here’s the sound of beta males who got elected to positions of power which they don’t know how to use and wouldn’t if they did know.

The mayor of Minneapolis, the town where the riots started, is Jacob Frey, who lamely intoned: “If you’re feeling that sadness and that anger, it’s not only understandable, it’s right.” Here he is in action:

Frey, who pleaded for calm, also approved the decision to abandon the city’s 3rd Precinct station on Thursday night, surrendering it to protesters who set fire to the building.

He pleaded for calm. Meanwhile in Washington the Alpha Male commented:

Trump said he couldn’t “stand back & watch this happen to a great American City. A total lack of leadership. Either the very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey, get his act together and bring the City under control, or I will send in the National Guard & get the job done right.”

Jacob took offense. “Donald Trump knows nothing about the strength of Minneapolis. We are strong as hell.”

Sure you are, Jacob.

~ Sayo Naraba

Meanwhile in Manhattan …

birdStep aside, Florida Man. You can’t compete with New York.

So there was this woman in Central Park and this man in Central Park, and they got into this thing, and they became instantly famous.

It happened in a part of Central Park known as the Ramble. So I suppose we could call this Rumble in the Ramble.

They probably haven’t gotten this far in thinking it through, but this incident will no doubt lead their obituaries.

Both have the surname Cooper, so there’s that. One is male, the other female. One is white, the other black. One went to Harvard, the other to the University of Chicago.

And here’s something you won’t see out there in Sheboygan as you watch your soaps and knit ebola masks for the women’s auxiliary fundraiser: One is an investment banker, the other was “a trailblazing queer comic writer.” That’s something you see only in Manhattan.

Of course the incident was recorded. This is 2020. Let’s go to the videotape.

A fellow named Chadwick Moore — isn’t that a great name? — bravely attempts to explain this to people who live in, say, Dubuque in an article entitled, “In Central Park, an unstoppable Karen meets the immovable Karen.”

If you’ve ever smugly pulled out your cellphone to record a confrontation with a stranger, hoping to publicly humiliate that person and even destroy their life, you’re probably a Karen of the worst ilk. Likewise, if approached by an insufferable busybody who lives to scold people minding their own business, and your first reaction is to call the police, you’re also a Karen. Manhattan is filled with Karens, the meme that once referred to the ‘can I speak to the manager’ lady with stacked hair and chunky highlights that evolved into a way to call out any very annoying person who loves rules and tattling.

What’s it got to do with me here in Kankakee? you might ask. Chadwick offers:

It is high Karen season across the country. The coronavirus pandemic has been their time to shine as petty authoritarians feel emboldened to enforce their government’s frivolous rules about masks and social distancing. Not wearing a panty-liner over your face while out for a stroll, you must want people to die, according to the Karen.

But it’s never really about the rules. Karenism is a spiritual malady and New York is such prime Karen territory perhaps because it’s a place that reminds people every day of their own insignificance. Plenty of people feel compelled to assert themselves in the most asinine circumstances to fight that nagging suspicion they actually don’t matter. Finger wagging at a litterbug or fake coughing as you pass by someone enjoying a cigarette is how the Karens reassure themselves that they are, in fact, here and alive in a world that exists only to disappoint.

Be careful out there.

~ Heteroclite

Wanna bet your life on a model?

maxresdefaultNext time we go through one of these pandemic panics, we need to ask two questions; “Sez who?” and “How come it is?”

We closed down entire countries based on seriously flawed models, most notoriously that of British scientist Neil Ferguson of Imperial College.

The model was severely flawed. The model’s software was 13 years old, with a program that predicted at random. Adding on to the fact is that new records are coming out of this particular scientist of a history of failed predictions.

“In 2001 the Imperial College team’s modelling led to the culling of 6 million livestock and was criticised by epidemiological experts as severely flawed. In various years in the early 2000s Ferguson predicted up to 136,000 deaths from mad cow disease, 200 million from bird flu and 65,000 from swine flu. The final death toll in each case was in the hundreds,” note biologist Matt Ridley and Member of Parliament David Davis. “In this case, when a Swedish team applied the modified model that Imperial put into the public domain to Sweden’s strategy, it predicted 40,000 deaths by May 1 – 15 times too high.”

The UK shut down because of Ferguson’s model, yet Ferguson and Imperial College refused all requests to examine taxpayer-funded code that supported one of the most significant peacetime decisions.

Next time, when you hear a prediction, decide to wait until all the evidence is in. Ferguson would appear at first glance to be reputable, so don’t trust any old “expert.” Always ask: Who are you? How do you know? Keep questioning. And if the experts and government officials tell you to do something, always ask, “Why?” Keep asking “Why?.”

~ Nimrod

A memory of what we used to be

poppy

Roger Kimball is an American art critic and conservative social commentator. He is the editor and publisher of The New Criterion and the publisher of Encounter Books.

He observes:

In the middle of my tiny neighborhood on the Connecticut shore, there is a nobbly, plinth-like stone about 2 feet high surrounded by a circle of grass and some simple decorative stonework. On one side of the stone there is a brass plaque to “the eternal memory” of the 26 men from the neighborhood who fought in World War I, “the great conflict between liberty and autocracy.” On the other side, a plaque commemorates the 17 men who fought in World War II “that mankind might live in freedom.”

Every year for the more than two decades we’ve lived here, the neighborhood has marked Memorial Day with a little celebration: some children parade, place flowers by the stone, someone makes a few remarks at the clubhouse across the street. This year, there’s been no talk of getting together for a Memorial Day celebration because getting together is verboten. Our ancestors fought for liberty against the forces of autocracy, “that mankind might live in freedom.” We cower in our homes, constantly told to “practice social distancing,” and not to venture out of doors without a mask.

In a recent neighborhood survey, 86 percent of the respondents (but not your faithful correspondent) were in favor of people keeping “a minimum 6-foot distance” from one another (my emphasis), 60 percent were in favor of “limiting large group gatherings on common properties.”

One respondent noted that she (I feel sure it was a “she,” though the posted responses were anonymous) would be “happy to wear a mask in the neighborhood” but wanted “guidelines.” For example, “should I wear one in my front yard?” I would say yes, she should. “What about when running?” Definitely when running. Also when showering or eating.

Another respondent advised wearing a mask “when off one’s property,” while a third scolded that “Any event must have social distancing, even by children, have ample space for social distancing, and require masks.”

I wonder what the 43 men commemorated on that neighborhood stone would have made of this Eloi-like display of conformity, egged on by bottomless docility, on the one side, and Nurse Ratched disapprobation, on the other. I do not think they would approve.

For the past two months, the country has been on a moral bender, intoxicated by fear and panic. As with most benders, the aftermath will be painful. But the symptoms this time will not be nausea and headache but shame at our credulousness and rage against those who exploited it. Rage. Look for it in a neighborhood near you in the coming weeks and polling stations across the country in November.

~ Leonidas

An app that flips off The Donald

flip

I have the Flipboard app on my phone and like it because the interface is kind of fun. You have to use it to know what I mean. However, the “news” Flipboard brings me is un unrelenting firestorm of Trump criticism.

Flipboad is a 10-year-old news aggregator created by two California sofware types.

Here is a sampling of the articles these “journalists” gave me yesterday.

  • Trump Tells Agencies to Slash Environmental and Health Protections
  • This may be Donald Trump’s most damaging legacy
  • Trump Campaign Cites Bogus Medical Society To Defend Unproven Medication
  • Trump Steps Up Attacks on Mail Vote, Making False Claims About Fraud
  • Trump Is Brazenly Interfering With the 2020 Election
  • Trump tweets he’ll kill Nevada’s federal funds if state votes by mail, after threatening state of Michigan with the same
  • Fact-checking And Assessing Trump’s Letter Of Rebuke To WHO
  • Trump inspector general scandal expands to include Secretary Chao
  • How Biden wallops Trump
  • Too Late, Martha McSally Discovers Standing By Her Man Donald Trump Was A Really Stupid Idea
  • Republicans Are Planning to Spend $20 Million So Americans Won’t Vote
  • Trump doesn’t really want to be president
  • Biden warns of ‘abuse of power’ in measured Trump critique

And that’s just one day!

~ Feuilleton

Whole milk is good for you

cow

God made cows and cows make milk full of fat and, the Bible says, “and God saw that it was good.” If it pleases the Big Guy, it’s good enough for me.

So don’t go second guessing Him, even if your doctor tells you to. Doctors can be as foolish as the rest of us.

Full fat milk (the kind cows make and of which God approves) can help prevent diabetes and other bad things.

Eating at least two daily servings of dairy is linked to lower risks of diabetes and high blood pressure, as well as the cluster of factors that heighten cardiovascular disease risk (metabolic syndrome), according to a large international study published online in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.

Here’s a good rule of thumb for living life: Avoid syndromes when possible.

Of course we’ve known this about milk for some time. You can also mix some dark chocolate in your whole milk.

Who says there is no God?

~ Hippocrene

 

This is not your father’s coronavirus

covidFor most of the population — 80 percent, they say — the Kung Flu was a non event. If they got sick it lasted a week or so and was a flu-like annoyance.

For 15 percent of us, however, it became a serious illness. For 5 percent, it became critical, and in this last group were those who died.

I had it, and it took six weeks to fully recover. I didn’t require hospitalization and never became critical, although as I read more about it I did worry at times and asked my doctor for reassurance. What my research tells me is that living or dying for some is a result of a genetic roll of the dice. Some people have immune responses that just don’t work right.

My doctor says I’m not contagious and that I’m immune, at least for the time being. This is the thinking of the CDC. What I know is that I’m going to take this thing seriously, especially in the fall when we start closing wndows and staying inside.

Here’s the headline of a USA Today article:

‘Something we’ve never seen before’: Scientists still trying to understand baffling, unpredictable coronavirus

The article continues:

The new coronavirus has spread like wildfire, killed – and spared – people of all ages and all health conditions, baffled doctors, defied guidance and conventional wisdom, and produced an unprecedented array of symptoms.

There’s never been a virus like it.

“This gets into every major biological process in our cells,” said Nevan J. Krogan, a molecular biologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who has studied HIV, Ebola, Zika, dengue and other viruses over the past 13 years.

“At the molecular level, it’s something we’ve never seen before, and then look at what it does to the body – the long list of symptoms – we’ve never seen that before.”

I’m sympathetic to the point of view that our national reaction has been overblown. At the same time, having experienced the virus, I have a deep respect for it.

There are some who beieve that we can’t really stop a virus from spreading, no matter how many masks we buy. I’m sympathetic to that, as well, but I’m not going to needlessly expose myself or family to it.

~ Al Desko