You need sun and fresh air to stay healthy

A New York doctor at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak says his hospital is like a “petri dish.”

Do you know why? And do you know why hospitals are notorious for respiratory infections?

Windows. They can’t open windows to let in fresh air. And fresh air kills viruses.

In the years before antibiotics became available, open-air therapy was the standard treatment for tuberculosis (TB) and other infectious diseases. Patients were nursed next to open windows in cross-ventilated wards or put outside, in their beds, to breathe fresh outdoor air. This was believed to aid their recovery and reduce the risk of cross- and re-infection. The open-air regimen was also widely used on casualties during the First World War; and during the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic.

We learned this in the 1918 flu epidemic, but we forgot it.

flu outsidePut simply, medics found that severely ill flu patients nursed outdoors recovered better than those treated indoors. A combination of fresh air and sunlight seems to have prevented deaths among patients; and infections among medical staff.[1] There is scientific support for this. Research shows that outdoor air is a natural disinfectant. Fresh air can kill the flu virus and other harmful germs. Equally, sunlight is germicidal and there is now evidence it can kill the flu vi

Florence Nightingale understood this: “A nurse is to maintain the air within the room as fresh as the air without, without lowering the temperature.” What hospitals looked like in her day:

old hospital

What hospitals look like today:
modern hospital
Breathe deeply.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s