Surveillance Society: Big Brother is Watching You

face

The feds know pretty much everything about you.

DHS wants to expand airport face recognition scans to include US citizens. Homeland Security wants to expand facial recognition checks for travelers arriving to and departing from the U.S. to also include citizens, which had previously been exempt from the mandatory checks. The department has proposed that all travelers, and not just foreign nationals or visitors, will have to complete a facial recognition check before they are allowed to enter the U.S., but also to leave the country.

The Feds Don’t Need To Tell You Or Get A Warrant To Collect Your Emails And Phone Records. In reality, the government can obtain these records without taking any such extraordinary measures — and no judge even need be involved for Congress to get them. It can simply send a subpoena to the carrier. This seemingly astonishing explanation exists because under current law, these records are not protected by any warrant requirement.

Google Hands Feds 1,500 Phone Locations In Unprecedented ‘Geofence’ Search. The requests, outlined in two search warrants obtained by Forbes, demanded to know which specific Google customers were located in areas covering 29,387 square meters (or 3 hectares) during a total of nine hours for the four separate incidents. Unbeknownst to many Google users, if they have “location history” turned on, their whereabouts are stored by the tech giant in a database called SensorVault. In this case, Google found 1,494 device identifiers in SensorVault, sending them to the ATF to comb through.

Surprise! U.S. has more surveillance cameras per citizen than China. China may have gained a reputation as a surveillance state because it has more closed circuit TV (CCTV) cameras deployed than any other country, but when it comes to per capita usage, the US is No 1. The US has 15.28 surveillance cameras per 100 citizens, slightly higher than China’s density of 14.36.

Privacy advocates raise alarms about growing use of facial recognition by U.S. government. Whether we realize it or not, most of use some type of facial technology software every day. It’s being widely used in shopping, home security, and law enforcement, and millions of us use it constantly to open our smart phones. But privacy advocates and civil libertarians are raising alarms about the growing use of facial recognition technology by the federal government. Several noted that once the government has a database of Americans with their photographs, there’s no telling what it could be used for. “You never know,” said one man, “10 years 20 years down the line, what that information might be used for.”

~ The Fulgurator

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s